FAMILY ROLE-PLAY GAMES

"The Family Games" include familiar family crises:

Ћ Planning The Family Vacation

Ћ Staying Married

Ћ Getting Divorced

Ћ Planning Dad's Future

Ћ Dividing Grandma's Things, available as a free sample game

ииии Planning The Family Vacation ииии A family tries to agree on a vacation plan that satisfies their most important interests. When will it be? Where will it be? How much will it cost? What can we do when we're there? This game can be played by players of all ages. It teaches basic problem solving skills and the importance of using both common and differing interests to find valuable solutions to shared problems. The players include Dad who is secretly having problems at work, Mom who is secretly having marital problems, the Teenage Son and Daughter who are both having parent problems, the Pre-teen Son and Daughter, the toddler and the family pet.

ииии Staying Married ииии finds a dissatified husband and wife meeting with other important members of their extended family just before their tenth anniversary to decide what the terms of their marriage will be for the next ten years. This game teaches the importance of relationship building or rebuilding and what a marriage means to the community in which it exists. The players are the husband; the wife; their adopted, blind fourteen year old nephew; the angry nine year old child; the husband's best friend who is also the family lawyer; the wife's best friend; one of the husband's parents; and one of the wife's parents.

ииии Getting Divorced ииии finds the husband and wife negotiating the terms of their divorce agreement. This game also teaches the importance of relationship building and the experience of a real divorce negotiation. What will happen to the children, the house and the marital assets? The players are the husband, the wife, the other woman, the angry fourteen year old child, the husband's lawyer, the wife's lawyer, the wife's best friend, and the wife's parent.

ииии Planning Dad's Future ииии finds the entire family meeting to decide what to do about Dad's apparent mental decline. Where will he live? Who will take care of him? What will happen to Mom? How will this be paid for? This game involves a number of classic potential family conflicts that gives players the experience of planning for a crisis with aging parents and surfaces the tensions that often exist in any family as it grows older. The players are Dad, Mom, their three adult children, one of their grandchildren, a nursing home social worker and a lawyer.

ииии Dividing Grandma's Things, available as a free sample game ииии finds Grandma's eight contentious heirs forced to agree to divide all of the ten most valuable pieces of her estate if they want anything at all. Her prized possessions range from two valuable houses, a classic 1957 Thunderbird to her beloved golden retriever and her despised cat that nobody wants. This game is an enjoyable way to help families think about how they would like to distribute an older member's things. The players include Grandma's three adult children, her two adult siblings, her two teenage grand children and her life-long best friend.